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. >>> in afghanistan tonight a lot of unanswered questions about the shocking assassination of president hamid karzai's half-brother. shot in cold blood at his home by a trusted associate. we have the story from kabul. >> reporter: hi, ann. ahmed wali karzai, he was lured out of a meeting and shot in cold blood. he was shot and killed by other security guards. he used the trust to lure him out of a meeting and shoot him in cold blood. he was also shot and killed by other security guards. the taliban have claimed responsibility saying they had been working with the killer for, quote, some time." awk was an infamous power broker in kandahar province, a key province and the spiritual home of the taliban and considered to be a part of the drug trade but u.s. and nato officials say they needed him, a stabilizing figure and an otherwise unstable region. his death leaves behind a power vacuum and is considered a big victory for the taliban, ann? >> thank you so much. >>> another milestone up in space today as two residents of the international space station stepped outside to retrieve a broken ammonia pump
back the wars in iraq and afghanistan. what's notable about this, it doesn't include any new revenues through taxes. as you know, the white house has been fighting for this for weeks and now under senator reid's plan there are no new revenues through tax reform. the president has come out and said schae ports senator reid's plan. he says it is a reasonable approach but we're still deadlocked just eight days out. >> thank you, kristen. >>> and serving on the budget committee. good afternoon, senator. >> good afternoon, dylan. thanks for a chance to be he. >> thanks for joining us. insight what you think this deal ends up looking like? >> well i think a number of us are disappoint we're not going to do the bigger deal that the president and leader reid have been pressing for that a number of us republicans and democrats in the senate pressed for. i view leader reid's offer as a last-ditch effort to avoid default. my hope is that republicans can hear us saying, yes. it's a deal that doesn't touch medicare, medicaid, social security or include revenue increases. hits the $2.7 trillion tar
of afghanistan. he sat down to interview capt. there. at the end of the interview, he realized that capt. in that isolated outpost in afghanistan, because of this hyper connectivity had access to more intelligence and more firepower than martin dempsey did when he took baghdad from saddam hussein. that has driven his whole education of the army system. at the camp, they give every new recouped and iphone and you download the application and teach the class. when you have a commander in the outpost of afghanistan with more power -- more firepower and access to intelligence than you did when he commanded the troops who took baghdad, that commander has to be trained to invent, reinvent, and adapt so much more than anyone can -- anyone 10, 15, 20 years ago. that's happening throughout the labor market. what does it mean for education? >> it means we have to educational challenges today. we need more education in better education. buy more education, and this is a challenge all of the face, we need to bring the bottom up to our average and we need to do it really fast. at the same time, we ne
was visiting an outpost in the far reaches of afghanistan. he sat down to interview capt. there. at the end of the interview, he realized that capt. in that isolated outpost in afghanistan, because of this hyper connectivity had access to more intelligence and more firepower than martin dempsey did when he took baghdad from saddam hussein. that has driven his whole education of the army system. at the camp, they give every new recouped and iphone and you download the application and teach the class. when you have a commander in the outpost of afghanistan with more power -- more firepower and access to intelligence than you did when he commanded the troops who took baghdad, that commander has to be trained to invent, reinvent, and adapt so much more than anyone can -- anyone 10, 15, 20 years ago. that's happening throughout the labor market. what does it mean for education? >> it means we have to educational challenges today. we need more education in better education. buy more education, and this is a challenge all of the face, we need to bring the bottom up to our average and we need to do
on jobs in baghdad, kabul, kandahar, in other parts of the iraq and afghanistan. and the irony of course is that we are being told that we are in this terrible crisis, when the republicans brought out a military bill that increased the military by $17 billion, gives more money to iraq and afghanistan, and i have to say i am very nervous that the president might agree to keep troops in iraq next year, which is longer than george bush wanted to keep them there. so, yeah, i think we can in the short-term save a lot of money by bringing the troops home with no negative job impact. but to get back to your question, what mr. bernanke said correctly is, yes, over the long-term, you should have a plan for deficit reduction from both higher taxes in my judgment and spending cuts. but in the short-term, if you were to do that, you would slow down the recovery. and that's why it's a timing issue. >> in terms of what you just said there about defense cuts, and what might be possible in this congress, i feel like the things that i have heard from republicans that seem like they have sort of silver li
, in the cases of two men who died in cia custody, one in iraq and one in afghanistan, there is enough evidence to warrant a full criminal investigation. the department of justice says it agrees with those findings, and it will begin that criminal investigation. nearly a decade after the government put the cia secretly into the business of holding prisoners offshore, five years after the president of the united states admitted to the country that we were doing that, the treatment of two prisoners of the dozens held in that system, will be investigated. the other 99 cases, case closed. >>> earlier today, the top republican in the senate, mitch mcconnell, formally invited president obama to come up to >>> earlier today, the top republican in the senate, mitch mcconnell, formally invited president obama to come up to capitol hill and talk things over with senators. come have lunch with us, let's talk. invitation came at 10:45 eastern time this morning. an hour and a half later, with the republican invitation still out, still pending, out came senate democrats to call the republican offer to the pr
conflict and iraq and afghanistan and people would not be in these combat roles to find themselves on the front line to support units that have females floor and traditional roles that people did not sign of to be in the infantry. >> traditionally we felt combat was infantry unit now we find it jessica lynn two was supply person on the convoy in pfizer self -- finds itself in a firefight that i want to go back to that but it use the someone like ruby where the bomber got the front line going into the cafeteria she was one of the people blown up. the reality is i would say that is the front line. >> guest: surprisingly women are off to it -- often under acknowledge because there are no combat roles for women. whether because of current policy or because women are suddenly finding they are put in that place but it there is a role for women in this capacity that the policy makers are useful such as being at translators are serving and civil affairs and help gain the indigenous women and children to communicate with them. >> host: when we go into afghanistan may go to the villages to w
rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'd like to welcome pack to the pentagon briefing room, army lieutenant general david rodriguez. he's commander of the international security assistance force joint command, also known as i.j.c. and also the deputy commander of the united states forces afghanistan. general rodriguez's current tour began in june, 2009, he became the first commander of the i.j.c. in october of that year. prior to that, general rodriguez was commander of regional command east for 15 months from january, 2007 to april, 2008. next week after two straight years in command and more than 40 months in after gap stan over the past 4 1/2 year, general rodriguez is ski wruled to change command and return stateside to have u.s. army forces
, and taking into account significant gains made in u.s. operations and against al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan over the past year, counterterrorism efforts in yemen must be a central focus of our national security strategy. that said, our -- closely in line with political, economic and developmental challenges as well. those challenges are those that the united states must work to address as part of a holistic approach to this challenge. first of all, just outlined three. three priorities. first, we need a better understanding of the political opposition and prospects for democratic reform. acting president, the vice president in yemen, as only a small power base in the opposition appears fractured between the so-called joint meeting parties, jmp. and other individuals such as the former commander of the first armored division and check out omar, leader of the powerful fellow. over the weekend elements of the opposition asked the formation of a shadow government to the composition and support, i should say though the -- for those the composition and support for the group remains u
in afghanistan. fourthly, a plan of a special envoy -- appointment of a special envoy. when you make these recommendations, are you saying we're not curly undertaking any of them or do you see some of them as an expansion of what we are doing? or as i was in before, more of a focused approach? >> sir, i served in iraq and afghanistan. you see again and again, usaid, the state department, having difficulties. it when i started working on yemen, it is a familiar situation to me, although, it is not iraq and afghanistan. it is focused on working with local partners that may or may not work in the areas we are mostly concerned with. it is overly centralized, very focused on process and sort of the factions that in the national capital. i cannot take with the political opposition is. that is the political opposition we need to be worried about. but we do not have a good understanding of the human terrain. and iraq, could almost happen by accident. -- it on this happen by accident. i think most of our human terrain is probably focused on the counter-terrorism mission. it is not about the h
deliberately put us in debt with tax breaks, the wars in iraq and afghanistan. they have borrowed all of the money. grover norquist toll call them -- told all of them to not raise taxes under any reason, host: independent from utah. caller: thank you, c-span. our founding fathers would turn over in their graves if they found out how much money we are putting our children in the dead. but they never wanted the constitution to deal with that. guest: our current levels of debt are sustainable. they are high levels of debt, but as a percentage of gdp, it is a lot lower than greece. it is a lot lower than italy. within the last couple of days, we realize they have serious problems. i do not know if the free market and a particular vision of how high are debt would be relative to gdp. they are huge, relative to the wealth we have it. economies expand over time. we have recessions, we have lifts, and we have declines. over the long term, economies grow. our economy will be much larger 30 years from now than it is today. that does not mean we want fiscal problems or we will be able to balance
pakistan is critical to the success in afghanistan, as a supply route. things have been tense for a while. highlighted by the apparent lack of communication surrounding our raid that took out bin laden on their soil. today, white house chief of staff bill daley made clear that until we patch it up with pakistan, their wallets will be lighter. >> obviously, they have been an important ally in the fight on terrorism. they've been victim of enormous amount of terrorism. but right now, they have taken some steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were giving to their military. >> reporter: using broader strokes, president obama said this week that we need to keep giving foreign countries aid so they don't become terrorist breeding grounds. he thinks it's worth it though we don't have dough to spare at home. >> it's smart for us to make a very modest invest in the foreign aid. it's a force multiplier and something that even in tough fiscal times, america needs to continue to do as part of our role as global leader. >> reporter: the money we withhold won't affect non
to iraq and six times to afghanistan as a member of a ranger helicopter assault team. on may 26th, 2008, sergeant petry and his unit was in afghanistan, part of the rugged mountainous region near the border with pakistan that's perfect for hiding out in. sergeant petry's unit was assigned to make a risky daylight raid on a compound why u.s. intelligence said a top al qaeda commander was hiding. the moment the helicopter landed they came under fire. within minutes as they moved into a courtyard in the compound a machine gun round went through both of his legs. he was bleeding badly. he nevertheless aided another wounded soldier leaving him to take cover behind a chicken coop in the courtyard. he did this with severe injuries to both of his legs. sergeant petry launched a grenade in the direction of the enemy fighters, who were shooting at the rangers. that provided enough cover for a third ranger to join them behind the chicken coop to evaluate the wounds. an enemy grenade exploded in the courtyard. it further hurt the ranger that he was helping and the third ranger. a second grenade thr
current conflicts in iraq and afghanistan. people who traditionally wouldn't be in these kinds of combat roles are finding missiles very much on the frontline and that means support units that have females in them and or untraditional roles that people who didn't sign up to be in the infantry are finding themselves on this frontline. traditionally the combat was the infantry unit. now we find jessica lynch who was a supply person on a convoy and she finds herself in a firefight and she finds herself as the first p.o.w.. i want to go back to that and a little while because of course you were involved with some of that. you see someone like ruby who was in -- on the day that we -- the bomber got through the frontline and went into the cafeteria, to the mess hall and blew up the place. she was one of the people blown up so the reality is i would say that is the frontline. almost anyone is on the frontline now if you are in a place like iraq or afghanistan. >> guest: surprisingly women are often on a college for serving those rules because there were no combat roles for women and whether tha
have no front line in the current conflict in iraq and afghanistan, and people who traditionally wouldn't be in these schools are finding themselves very much on the front line and that means support units that have females and and traditional roles that people didn't sign up to be in the infantry are finding themselves on this front line. >> host: traditionally we felt combat with infantry use, so now we find this jessica lange, who was a supply person on a convoy, and she finds herself in a firefight, and she finds herself as a first p.o.w. which i want to go back to in a little while because you were involved in some of that. you see someone like ruby up in mosul on the day that the bomber got through the front line and went from the cafeteria and blew up the place and was one of the people blown out. the reality is i would say that is the front line almost any place is a front line if you were in a place like iraq or afghanistan. >> guest: yeah, and surprisingly, you know, women are often not acknowledge for serving those rules because there is no combat role for the women, and whet
to debate the timing of our military drawdown in afghanistan. my belief is that the general's voice should carry the most weight. what is wrong as for the republican party to shrink from the challenges of american leadership in the world. history repeatedly warns us that in the long run, weakest and foreign policy cost us and our children much more than we will ever say in the budget -- saved in the budget line item. america has one political party devoted to decline and withdrawal it doesn't need a second one. our enemies respect and respond to strength. sometimes strength means military intervention. sometimes it means diplomatic pressure. that always means moral clarity in word and deed. that is the legacy of republican foreign policy at its best in our next republican president must carry the banner around the world. of equality and opportunity for all citizens, it remains a dream for people in the middle east and around the world. as america stands for these principles and stands with our friends and allies, the middle east will transform this moment of turbulence into a more lasting
military engagements in iraq, afghanistan, and now libya. i speak of the need also of a new smart security to keep america safe. today will be my 399th speech. i look forward to reaching number 400 next week, and i will continue this until my last day as a member of congress, which gives me approximately 18 months, 1 1/2 years, time to bring our troops safely home. during this week, the week that the house is debating the appropriations, i thought it would be fitting to focus on more spending, on the staggering costs that taxpayers are being asked to bear for our military occupation. $10 billion a month is a lot of money, and that's the price tag for the privilege of continuing to wage a 10-year war against afghanistan. $10 billion a month. the american people who are writing that check have a right to ask and to get answers to some very important questions. where is that money going and what exactly is it accomplishing? what are we getting for our $10 billion a month? are we more secure here at home? is the afghanistan central government introducing the rule of law? have we not already de
they get to afghanistan. we want you to listen and watch some of the things that we saw when we went there. >> the wounds appear to be superficial. >> 15 up, and ten minutes back. category a, priority one. >> reporter: every day, dozens of trauma patients are wheeled here. this man came from multiple stab wounds. but right alongside the civilian trauma doctors, nurses and techs, military personnel. >> the injuries that i have treated here and see here at this hospital are the closest thing to the injuries that i saw in iraq that i experienced in the continental of the united states. i have had a gentleman whose entire scalp was torn off in an industrial accident, and i have an individual who was now involved in a motor vehicle accident, and we have to rerecrate the skull like we have to do in an ied blast. >> if you suffer one of these traumas, but if you do, there is going to be medical personnel who was in the medical war zone, either as a reservists, or who served in active duty and then retired and went into private practice in communities across the country. doctors tell us what they
in afghanistan. there is a string of killings that are targeting high-ranking officials. to keep in balance after 50, i switched to a complete multivitamin with more. only one a day women's 50+ advantage has ginkgo for memory and concentration, plus support for bone and breast health. a great addition to my routine. [ female announcer ] one a day women's. -why? -why? -why? [ female announcer ] we all age differently. roc® multi-correxion 4 zone moisturizer with roc®retinol and antioxidants. lines, wrinkles, and sun damage will fade. roc multi-correxion. correct what ages you. we get double miles on every purchase, so me and the boys earned a trip to dc twice as fast! oh hi! we get double miles every time we use our card. and since double miles add up fast... one more chariot please. ...we can bring the whole gang! i cannot tell a lie. he did it. right... it's hard to beat double miles! read my lips -- no new axes! [ male announcer ] get the venture card from capital one, and earn double miles on every purchase, every day. go to capitalone.com. what's in your wallet? so, you're a democrat right?
for the freedoms we all enjoy. they include, of course, those who have died in iraq and afghanistan. in tonight's "making a difference" report, we meet an exceptional group of women who have lost their husbands or fiances in those wars, and have joined forces now to help themselves heal and to embrace life. nbc's peter alexander has their story. >> ready, set, go! >> reporter: they are fun-loving and fearless. a brave group of women with something else in common, too. they are all military widows. who lost their loved ones in iraq and afghanistan. taryn davis was 21 when her husband, michael, was killed by a roadside bomb in iraq in 2007. >> one of the last things i said to him was i love you more than life itself. >> reporter: living without michael is an everyday struggle. >> when i went out into the world i just felt like they didn't want to embrace who i was. which was a military widow. and in the back of my mind, i'm thinking, that title, it symbolizes my husband's sacrifice and my own. and if i can get through it, maybe one day it can signify my survival. >> reporter: to help her own heal
. >> let's shift to afghanistan and the taliban. any opening there? the mother might be some stuff going on behind the scenes. that is actually one of the problems. you do not have a single channel. you do not have a single diplomatic framework like you did in the northern ireland. you have a number of governments that are getting mixed messages to the taliban. >> who are those governments? >> pakistanis, afghanistan, america, uae, turkey. there are a variety of people putting out overtures, and that is confusing. these terrorists are not the most sophisticated actors in the world. they are generally young men who have been indoctrinated from a young age. having so many people involved in this is confusing. you need to create a single channel and coordinate the message. we're not doing that yet. we do not have the intelligence assets -- the insides that we need into the taliban. there was an embarrassing incident a couple of months ago, where we thought it on the number two person in the taliban, mullah omar, who wanted to talk, thought there might be room for negotiation and compromise,
.m. in washington, and early families of british soldiers who died in iraq and afghanistan have expressed shock and anger that their phones may have been hacked. personal details of bereaved relatives were found in the files of the private detective who intercepted voice mail messages for the "news of the world." news international, which owns the newspaper, said it would be appalled if there were any truth to the claims. >> "news of the world" prides itself on supporting british soldiers and the families of those who died on the front line. now it is alleged to have been responsible for hacking into the phones of some of those families. their phone numbers were found in the files of the private investigator. >> the families are very upset and disturbed. really upset. >> the royal british legion has dropped the "news of the world" as its campaigning partner, saying it will suspend its relationship with the partnership. >> we do not want to get ahead of ourselves. the police investigation is ongoing. we need to see the results of that. i have to say, if these actions have been verified, and i'm
's no military solutions to the conflicts we are fighting today as a in iraq and afghanistan, but in the end of the revolution of this will be a political matter and you say that's wrong. the first order of business and winning a war mecca's to kill the enemy fighters. a very forthright statement but one that does go against the grain, and i would ask you to forget afghanistan today and assess whether you think that approach of the enemy fighters is going to lead to something that can be called a military solution. >> guest: yes i do but i'm not saying the military solution is the only sort of resolution that matters. there has to be that a military solution. there has to be the position of the mind in the enemy you're going to get killed if you go up against the americans. there was something of this in iraq in the awakening to the rest of the country the idea this is a tribal battle but they turn out to be. i think it is now being impress upon the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one
initially and it does not count savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan but the democrat plan ... i'm sorry the democrat's plan extends the ceiling to 2012 and the republican plan does not do that. >>shepard: thank you, wendell amid the construction at the white house. so what happens to the checks the government writes if we hit the tell ceiling? that seemed unthinkable but no longer. analysts say it is not cheer because it never has happened before. and now the treasury department issued 200 million electronic payments last month. and now live from washington, hello. >> the government sends out 80 million checks each month just from the treasury and over all the number is higher. in the month of june the government issued 211 million electronic payments or checks. these are the top five categories: medicare, 100 million payments and 70 percent of that to doctors and the rest to other providers like hospitals and laboratories. second is the category we hear the most about, 56 million checks for social security. that is what everyone wants to make sure will keep coming. what
the war in afghanistan unhappy he failed to end the bush tax cuts and worried they may be able to cut spending significantly to win an increase in the debt ceiling. he must win his base to have hope of reelection but he knows if the independents who backed him in 2008 and if they don't come back his base isn't enough. even as they gave ground in spending and debt with negotiations with congressional republicans he talked about taxing the rich in the white house news conference this week. by today he was con sill tory again and confident with a deal. he is against kicking an issue down the road. he's the same guy who wanted a debt ceiling increase with no action on spending. eases like a man who took two dates to the prom and is trying to make two people happy. he may not pull it off but he is dancing as fast as he can. >> what about balance in the final deal? >>>> republicans -- the president in congress and democratic party on spending but the president fears that if he gives too much on spending and doesn't give anything seemingly in the deal other than the debt spending he will be
places in afghanistan where there are stories and continuing reports that iranian munitions and arms are arriving there. >> you are right. it is an ongoing concern. i have to put it in perspective though, because this is nothing from the weaponry coming in from iran. because if you look at that coming in from pakistan is two times less than iran. that doesn't mean it is insignificant, and we have to look for the trends in the weaponry, because if it is escalating in a major way, we have to think about responses and those could include the full range none of which are satisfying, but we may have to put more forces in the west of afghanistan and devote more afghan capability to the western border which is one of the defensive things you can do and think of some offensive actions. >> indeed. now, we are guard to pakistan, isn't withholding $800 million potentially self-injurious, because we, america, is relying on the pakistan army to fight radical islamic terrorists in their own backyard without those fund, and doesn't that stymie our attempt to fight al qaeda? >> absolutely. this is a
's got to step in? i've been here. i've been doing afghanistan and bin laden and -- the greek crisis. >> he has a point, if you go by the number of bills passed. through the first hall of this year, 2011, how many bills become law? 18. 15 of those laws named a building after somebody, extended an expiring law or appointed an official to the smithsonian institute. counting all them, 18 laws, this year's not so big number. >>> up next, kansas is inching closer to an all-out ban on abortion. the state approve as new set of regulations critics say is aimed at shutting down all abortion clinics. all three of them in the state. we're hear from both sides. >>> you're watching "hardball" on msnbc. i made. when i got my medicare card, i realized i needed an aarp... medicare supplement insurance card, too. medicare is one of the great things about turning 65, but it doesn't cover everything. in fact, it only pays up to 80% of your part b expenses. if you're already on or eligible for medicare, call now to find out how an aarp... medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare i
going onn today to remember this - anniversarr? 3& the drawdown from afghanistan as begunnnearly 700 u-s troops have already left the rovince of paawan... and another 600-soldiers are preparing to leave.by the end of the year... 10-thousand u-s soldiers are expected to depart.the complete drawdown is ssceduled to be complete before the staat of 20-15. 3 nelson mandela is celebrating his 93rd birthhay today. the former president of south african s spending the day with famiiy... at his ccildhood home.south africans and theeunited natioos are -3 marking the irthday... wwth a & call to perrorm at least 67 minutes of public ssrvicc. that's the number of years mandela has been serving the pubbic. 3 ever notice your memory isn't what ittused to be?if so... there might be an obvious eason for it.a new ptudy out of columbia university... finds that using - online search engines may bb chaaging the way we remember are more likely to remember stuff they donn' think hey'll be able to find later.but if they think hey can find i
afghanistan. >> reporter: it is the president's decision he is commander and chief some of his generaltop military folks said it wasn't really among the options they presented to him he went with a more aggressive plan we have seen a lot of violence attack at the intercontinental hotel and a roadside bomb that killed 13 additional people we will talk about whether afghanistan is ready for a draw down. >> right and then so what if there really isn't any going back now. >> reporter: yeah, sounds like it nothing is set in stone obviously, things changed markettedly he is the commander and chief he could change chorus and change plans we see in iraq for example, in the midst of a draw down there have been hints we might want to ask baghdad to say hey, let us leave a few more troops we thing it is in your best interest that is iraq's call and afghanistan we are setting the time table the president could change course. >> finally before we go, 4th of july upon us you will feature an actor, a regular here for capitol 4th celebrations this year he is premiering a documentary. >> reporter: lieuten
still in iraq and afghanistan, he has a rough road ahead. he told military families they are on the top of his agenda. >>> steven colbert started a superpac. it's part of a spoof on campaign finance laws but the hearing is real. he can use his show to produce ads. >> i'm reminded as we stand here of the pilgrims who on this very spot, but in massachusetts, filed their papers to form clement pack, to be free of the tyranny of king george who refused to allow a single corporate on u.s. presidential elections. >> i don't remember that from my history book. today in washington, republicans are taking things personally. hitting back at the president who laid into them for planning to go home next week on break instead of working on a budget deal. >> so maybe if he would take a valume and come down and talk, it might be helpful. >> it's the kind of language you expect from a leader of a third world country, not the president of the united states. >> frankly, he should be embarrassed. unfortunately, the threshold of embarrassment here in washington is different than the rest of the world. >> i
because of iraq and afghanistan those views are shifting. that invisible wounds, mental wounds, psychological wounds, are just as debilitating and in some cases more debilitating than losing a arm or leg. gwen: what is it about these wars that's different from other wars in changing people's opinions about that? >> part of it is the sheer number of tours. you have people going three, four, five, six times to these war zones. and part of the nature of the war itself. in world war ii, you had big battles where the guys to your left and right of you were shooting at enemies. and it was more of a conventional fight. in iraq and afghanistan, you could be walking as has been the case where i've been there, and a person who's a friend of yours suddenly disappears in an i.e.d. you never see the enemy who took his life. a very different kind of challenge. you are constantly afraid of something bad happening. and you never know who the person is who's doing that bad thing to you or the person you care about. >> yochi, does the policy change affect benefits in a way that needed some deep
the wars in iraq and afghanistan changed the way you guys do business. the wars have highlighted the need for persistent surveillance. that's something you guys have been involved in obviously in the space level. there's been a huge investment on unmanned vehicles on the air-breathing side to try to give a more persistent picture of what's going on on battlefields. how's that changed how you guys operate, how you guys work with the u.a.v. forces in order to get that best information to the troops in the field? >> vago, that's a great question. we've had to evolve tremendously over the last few years and we've evolve inside a way that helps the war fighter. let me just give you two examples that i think portray that. first geolocation of emitters and by that i mean phones, push-to-talk radios, whatever you want to talk about. when we combine ourselves with the persistent overhead airborn assets, we can do geo location of those emitters very, very quickly and usually those emitters are targets. >> right. >> second i.e. d.s. as you know, it's a tremendous problem. we do a great deal from sp
about afghanistan and what it calls men and women to serve and what they do so. let's look at this story. the deficit battle is favoring the gop. we will see house some of this plays out this week. : is thetion today is constitution still relevant? now to the democratic line with lawrence from new jersey. welcome. caller: thanks for taking my call. >> is the constitution still relevant? i don't think it does. most americans don't know anything about the treaty of kent. it says to return things to the way they were before. we established the federal government, the irs, and federal income-tax. anniversary ofe 2 the signing of this treaty. rights will be taken away. host: here's a comment from twitter. here's another comment on twitter. let's take a look at some final numbers. this is from culpeper, virginia. thanks for all your calls this morning. we will be back in a few moments talking about topics ranging from white people serve in the military to what americans think about patriotism. we will be right back. >> ♪ >> today on c-span, the dalai lama and vincent harding talk about non-v
doing afghanistan and bin laden and the greek crisis. you stay here! let's get it done. >> but, mr. obama himself has spent considerable time outside the nation's capital. obama was in brazil on march 19 when he announced his authorization of "limited military action" in libya. for that matter, he has been away from washington for a large part of the this 2 1/2 years as president. according to figures compiled at the end of 2010 by cbs reporter mark knoller, obama's first 23 months in office saw 70 days on foreign trips and 58 days on vacation trips. he's gambled at a pace to present himself as a statesman. above the scramble of something disagreeable called washington. >>> question, with regard to obama's leadership on domestic issues, what hasn't emerges from his issue, what pattern e pledges his first -- >> first of all, i don't think anyone thinks this president is not a hard worker. and he went after the congress to what a ridiculous work schedules where the house and the senate take different breaks, so you can't deal with the congress as a whole for half the time. and they w
. two wars in iraq and afghanistan, that if we were to draw down earlier for example in afghanistan, would deal with long-term debt issues. so let's put those things on the table. corporate loopholes, instead of just turning to the piggy bank of social security and medicare. >> what about medicaid? would you cut that? >> the challenge that we have for medicaid is that we want to make sure that we don't simply shift the burden onto the states, which really can't afford that right now. again the conversations about these entitlement programs, while i find, you know, might be important for us to engage in, we're conflating apples and oranges when it comes to lifting our debt ceiling and dealing with the major causal factors with our long-term debt. >> chris matthews plays "hardball" 5:00 and 7:00 eastern only on msnbc. the place for politics. >>> well, the hits keep on coming for rupert murdoch's embattled media empire. amid allegations that reporters at two of his other english newspapers, the "sun" and sunday "times," hacked into the bank account, legal files and medical records of f
fletcher, nbc news, oslo, norway. >>> as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops from afghanistan, another setback to report tonight. a suicide bombing has killed the mayor of kandahar, afghanistan's second largest city. the mayor who, by the way, was a dual afghan u.s. citizen was killed when an assassin detonated explosives hidden in his turban as the mayor met with tribal elders. >>> we have been reporting this week on the famine affecting millions in the horn of africa. today, a plane carrying the first airlift of urgently needed nutritional supplements landed in somalia. the shipment will be distributed to medical facilities to help starving children. >>> when we come back, the troubled life and far too early death of an olympian we got to know in vancouver, speedy as he was, he couldn't outrun his demons. >>> and later, closing the doors of an american institution after more than 100 years. mine was earned over the south pacific in 1943. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, because it offers a superior le
personal struggles. >>> the new secretary of defense in afghanistan with a striking new assessment of al qaeda. >>> final edition for a tabloid caught up in its own scandal. is there more to come? >>> and royal treatment. will and kate bring their charming style to the u.s. carrying on a long family tradition. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. betty ford, a former dancer, stay-at-home mom of four, and wife of a michigan congressman, never could have imaged the strange circumstances that in 1974 would land her and her husband, gerald ford, into the white house, but for a role she was unprepared for, first lady of the united states, she made a lot of it and changed thousands if not millions of lives in the process. betty ford died last night in california at the age of 93. she was known for speaking her mind, even when it didn't jive with her husband's political agenda, but she is best remembered for putting a public face to some awfully personal struggles and inspiring americans, particularly women, in ways no other first lady had. >>> at the ford museum in g
. here in the u.k., lawyers for the relatives of british soldiers killed in iraq and afghanistan say police have warned their clients that their phones may have been hacked into by the news of the world. the tabloid newspaper at the center of a phone hacking scandal. the parent company, news corporation, said it would be absolutely appalled and horrified if the allegations proved true. and the owner, rupert murdoch, has ordered full cooperation with police investigations. our political editor nick robinson reports. >> yes, there was even worse to come. the relatives of soldiers kill in iraq and afghanistan have been warned that their phones may have been hacked. according to tomorrow's daily telegraph. they joined the families of those whose loved ones were blown apart on 7-7. >> my mind went back to 2005. and the real emotional turmoil and state that we were in. and that somebody was listening to them. it's a violation, isn't it? >> also on the list of possible targets, the parents of holly and jessica who died. and of course mini dowler whose parents were given false hope that she
and done, iraq and afghanistan will suck the treasury dry to the tune of at least $3.7 trillion. enough already. mr. chairman, the pentagon is like that teenager. you keep giving the kid the keys to the car and he keeps crashing it. it's time we cut him off. we must draw the line and we must draw it here. no more money for libya. no more continuance in libyan hostilities. i urge my colleagues, support this amendment. i yield back. the chair: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. poe: the gentleman says we have gone to war in the name of humanity. in other words, the president's war in libya is so that we can preserve humanity in libya. in the history of peoples, as the gentleman from california has pointed out, in the histories of countries, it has always been the king, the dictator, the tyrant, the chief, the leader that has sent that particular country to war. so when our ancestors got together and they formed a new and perfect union, they decided it would not be the leader,
services and a surge of combat vets from the iraq and afghanistan wars entering the system, the demand for v.a. health care services has increased dramatically in recent years. this bill provides $58.6 billion for v.a. discretionary funding, $2.3 billion over current funding. the bill also includes $52.5 billion in fy 2013 advanced appropriations for vets' medical care. one of the very few areas in which this bill provides an increase in funding is v.a. medical research, which is $72 million over the budget request to restore funding to the current level. with little room to maneuver on the v.a. side of the ledger, the vast majority of the savings in the bill comes from incrementing or defunding certain military construction projects. the bill provides $13.7 billion for military construction, $1 billion below the request. the milcon reductions in the bill are restricted to the active-duty components. the guard and reserve components, family housing, barrack and other accounts are fully funded at the president's request. every military construction project funded in this bill is authori
at the long-term health care needs of veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan. actuaries talk about the challenge in estimating the future cost of treating brain injuries and posttraumatic stress disorder. also, the wife of a wounded marine corporal talks about her difficulty in getting care for her husband. this is an hour and 40 minutes. >> good morning and welcome to today's hearing, where we are going to examine the lifetime cost of supporting our newest generation of veterans. as we all know, when our nation goes to work, it is not just the cost of fighting that war that must be accounted for. we must include the cost of caring for veterans and families long after the fighting is over and that is particularly true today, at a time when we have more than half a million iraq and afghanistan veterans amid the hope care system that is in over 100% increase since 2008. this presents a big challenge and one that we have no choice but to step up to meet if we are going to avoid many of the famous geeks we saw with the vietnam generation. but it is more than just the sheer number of ne
have expanded radically with involvement in afghanistan and iraq. as we will hear, the u.s. as crated a police force in iraq that may number as many as 400,000 personnel. the goal of the u.s.-led nato training effort is at 157,000 police and the cost of this training program to the u.s. alone is about $1 billion per month. today, police assistance programs in the government are in multibillion-dollar effort led by the departments of defense and the department state but involving a number of other federal agencies. as programs have grown in size and cost, they also grow in kind. as you saw from the exhibition here on the screen, policing around the world is heavily impacted by history, culture, legal systems, and level of development. police forces differ markedly, so do they differ by agency and the country in which they work in. today, we have assembled a panel of very distinguished experts to discuss the various approaches that the u.s. government takes towards police training in foreign countries. you have the bad reviews for our speakers, so i will not do that. the speakers will c
that great contributions of this for the wars in afghanistan and iraq only 24% said increased domestic spending. and while there is a lot of focus on domestic spending, if you talk to the ode person, it's -- that spending is seen as -- if it involves waste, fraud and abuse. but when benefits or when the entitlements are considered, that's not considered waste, fraud and abuse. >> so when you -- when you asked him about the trade-off they're prepared to accept in terms of, you know, how much cutting are you as a citizen prepared to see, to deal with the debt what do you find? >> surprisingly, when you ask about what is more important, preserving benefits for social security and medicare, or reducing deficit or the debt, 2 to 1 people say preserve our benefits. there is very little give there. now republicans are of the -- more of the view that reducing the deficit should be given high priority. but even among republicans it's really interesting. there is a big income divide. affluent republicans say it is more important to reduce the deficit but poorer republicans, middle class and lowe
in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i would suggest it was the great national security fears that we have. >> in your book you have osama bin lade
joining you live this morning from new york. let's start with breaking news in afghanistan, the half brother of this country's president was shot in killed in kandahar. ahmed wali karzai owned his own guard, gunned him down in his house while he was entertaining friends. this karzai was a powerful council chief and pretty powerful guy, his name has been linked to drug dealing. one u.s. diplomatic cable turned up on wikileaks, widely known to be corrupt and narcotics trafficker. "every afghan family has suffered. i hope one day these sufferings end." >>> in the u.s. top democrats and republicans plan fill the gaps between spending gaps and other savings that republicans want. long and short of it, no deal yet, just a brick wall. we like jay leno's take on the whole debate. listen. >> i said no. >> i said no first! >> i said no first! >> no, i said no first! >> i said no first! >> question is, which one is the democrat? which one was the republican? president obama even alluded to childhood to describe where this debate stands. >> we might as well do it now, pull off the band-aid, eat
of defense, leon panetta. panetta arrived from afghanistan. iran is supplying weapons to extremists in iraq as they prepare to leave the country. panetta says he will not walk away from this challenge and urging iraq to crack down on the insurgents. troops were killed in june. three more in the first ten days of this month. a few hours after panetta spoke with u.s. troops, three rockets landed in the green zone in central baghdad, no casualties. >>> in texas, hundreds of people attended the funeral service today for a man who fell to his death at a texas rangers baseball game. 39-year-old shannon stone will be buried in his hometown of brownwood. a firefighter died thursday after falling 20 feet while trying to catch a ball for his 6-year-old son with him at the game. josh hamilton tossed a foul ball to the stands. he reached for the ball but lost his balance and crashed head first to a score board. the rangers have donated an undisclosed sum of money to help the stone family. >>> even though british tabloid "news of the world" printed the last issue on sunday, the scandal hitting rupert mu
as the u.s. is pulling out of iraq and afghanistan. >> reporter: well, just take a look at what's happening in baghdad today, jon. you have the iranian vice president who's arriving with a high profile delegation to baghdad to meet with iraqi prime minister nor i al-maliki, a fellow shia muslim, they're trying to build relations, and listen to senators joe lieberman and lindsey graham, who just returned from afghanistan: >> the biggest nightmare for the ayatollahs in iran is to have a democrat -- democracy in iraq and afghanistan on their borders so yes, they're helping the taliban, they're trying to react to debate that shia are trying to bring down democracy, they're trying to undermine their efforts. they're responsible for material coming into both countries that are killing not only american soldiers but the rec -- iraqi and afghan people. >> they've got the blood of a lot of people on their hands, including the hundreds of americans who have been killed in iraq as a result of iranian training and equipping of extremist militias. >> reporter: but i just asked general david rodriquez, w
troops this week. by 2014, it's expected foreign troops will have left all of afghanistan or be in support roles. >>> yesterday's handover took place in helmand province. it's a taliban stronghold where more foreign troops have died than in any other province. cbs news correspondent mandy clark was there for the changing of the guard. >> reporter: helmand province has been the deadliest battleground in afghanistan. nearly half of all coalition deaths have happened here. president obama's surge focussed on turning that around. the proichbs's capital saw troop movement of a different kind with the official handover to afghan forces. one sign of how fragile this security situation is, the ceremony was not announced in advance. out of fear the taliban would strike. the new commander of coalition forces in afghanistan acknowledged the heavy price american and british troops paid for the progress made here. >> there are some voices that are raised to question whether this sacrifice has been worth it. those of white house wear this uniform have one answer. yes! >> reporter: it wa
troops home from afghanistan. i do that because i have the privilege to represent the third district of north carolina, the home of camp lejeune marine base, cherry point and seymour johnson air force base. i have been privileged since i didn't serve to have great relationships with active duty and retired marines in the district, and i want to share with this house, mr. speaker, that we continue to support a corrupt leader and a corrupt government. just recently, the half brother of mr. karzai, half brother named wali karzai, was murdered in afghanistan. this only reinforces the fact that afghanistan is in a fragile situation at every level of their government. it is in chaos, quite frankly. just this week i spoke with a marine colonel who's been to afghanistan three times. he was in my office on tuesday, and he shared the same sentiments as the retired marine general who has been advising me for 20 months, and recently i emailed the general and said, please give me your ideas of what mr. obama has proposed in bringing 10,000 of our troops out in july and then another 23,000 in -- n
. they will have their independence day and all around the world, not just in iraq and afghanist afghanistan, we have our troops and we have many civilians that protect our embassies and try to bring freedom and a better way of life around the world and their courage, bravery and professionalism inspires me and i wish them the very best. >> well said. medications and drinking water to those around the world. dana, always great to see you. happy fourth of july. thanks so much for joining us. >> bye-bye, everybody. >> bye. >> we just showed you the closing arguments from the casey anthony trial. which side has the best chance to win? two attorneys are duking it out when we come back. >> and who should be able to honor the victims of september 11th? local union tries putting restrictions on a parade float. we'll explain that. >> i'm brian allen in iraq. i'd like to wish my family a happy fourth of july in texas many i love you and miss you very much. sweetie i think you need a little extra fiber in your diet. carol. fiber makes me sad. oh common. and how can you talk to me about fiber while you a
of afghanistan and iraq. >> the republicans we have on the show say they are open to the loophole cuts. are they? >> tom coburn is. he provides a lot of cover. >> i was wondering what mike was quoting. how many pages can you get read in the seventh inning stretch? >> it's in between innings. it's the entire game. >> the tough thing for president obama, he's going to say he will extend the deadline, if it looks like a deal is coming together. this, to me, is the difficult part. if all he had to deal with was the senate, i have no doubt in the next week you would have a deal that would work. the house is difficult. he's going to need to know from nancy pelosi and john boehner the votes are in place. today, not even close to that. >> you will lose 100, maybe 120 republicans right out. if you get most of the democratic caucus and boehner pulls in 100 republicans, it gets done. it's up to the democrats. i think boehner can get 100 republicans. can pelosi get 120 democrats? >> right. okay. we are going to get to bill karins on the heat in a minute. before we go, new developments in the hacking scandal
than a hundred al qaeda operatives in afghanistan. i'm not sure how he got that number but a u.s. official is saying al qaeda's power has diminished. i think the most important evidence is look back at the past ten years. al qaeda hasn't killed a single american on u.s. soil since 9/11 and it's such an important reminder for our viewers in america who have been infused with fear about al qaeda the past ten years. >> you talk about this infused fear. every so often, many a times throughout the year, we hear about chatter. there is chatter out there. there is chatter we should be concerned. what exactly do you think that means? because we never seem to get a definition on what that so-called "chatter" is. >> reporter: yeah, i'm not sure what chatter is. i think as journalists we have been guilty of not asking the tough questions. we have never asked what is chatter? we have never asked u.s. counterterrorism officials to show us evidence of chatter. and i think that is because of the impact of 9/11. this was the greatest american tragedy in recent memory. it had huge impact on ame
be the most egregious example to date of widespread corruption in afghanistan. american taxpayer money, hundreds of millions of dollars, ending up in the hands of the taliban. a year-long u.s. military task force discovered that the money was siphoned from a $2 billion transportation contract to provide most of the supplies to american troops. a source with knowledge of the investigation has briefed cnn about how it all went down. we are joined now from the afghan capital, kabul. just tell us briefly, how did this happen? >> reporter: this is coming from an internal report, but basically what happened was trucking companies subcontracted out to local entities here, who then in turn subcontracted out to even more local providers. what happened was it turns out that some of those local, more local firms actually had some ties to nefarious elements, including the taliban. what we see here is a bulk of the transportation costs being filtered through some of these trucking companies and part of that money is actually ending up in the hands of the very individuals who are fighting nato force
and not put them on the backs of our seniors. the wars in iraq and afghanistan, the president has already begun a drawdown a it could be significant so we save in the long run. making certain that people are back to work so they are contributing to our tax base in a way that we need. and we know that we have to raise revenue. we must race revenue. our seniors understand that. but what we cannot do is shift the burden for these things that were not caused by seniors onto the backs of our seniors by pushing them into really unfair cuts to their medicare and social security benefits. . mr. tonko: i'm going to do a bit of close and then ask each of the representatives that remain here on the floor, we were joined earlier by representative chu from california, to offer your sentiments and then we'll bring the hour to a close. but you know, what i think is very important to note is that if we can find ways to save on medicare we should invest that in medicare to strengthen medicare. if we can find ways to save in social security, reinvest in social security. they deserve to be stand alones beca
revenue in terms of what we are spending. $120 billion alone in afghanistan. alone. that doesn't include aid. 47, 000 troops still in iraq and we have tax cuts in place. >> the united states is strategically overextended worldwide. what are we doing borrowing money from japan and europe and persian gulf. we are overextended. >> exactly, pat. >> the country is overextended. you can't start fighting wars and not raise the revenue. >> maybe you ought to end the war. >> here we go. we have to do a little bit of everything. >> let's do one plan. we talk about both sides in broad strokes. walk us through what is actually inside the deficit reduction plan on each side. >> fair enough. >> simpson sets the standard. they came out with $4 trillion in deficit reduction. the paul ryan plan got about the same amount of deficit reduction, $4 trillion. the obama plan is $2.5 trillion of deficit reduction. the biden talks that have been going on are at zero, really, but they are talking $1 trillion spending cuts, maybe. by the way, even if the plan were adopted, we have $6 trillion more debt ten years f
and afghanistan, which republicans are likely to argue are not true cuts, so whose plan will prevail? in a conference call sunday boehner told his fellow house republicans i think we can win this for the american people, but then it's going to require some of you to make some sacrifices. if we stand together as a team, our leverage is maximized. they have to deal with us. >> that last comment was probably directed at the republican members who have said that they will not vote to raise the debt ceiling under any circumstances. speaker boehner will need their votes if he wants his legislation to win out in what is shaping up to be a partisan showdown. rebecca. >> cbs's nancy cordes on capitol hill. thanks, nancy. >>> if a deal does or does not happen, how does that affect most americans? joining us with answers is robin farzad, and already you are seeing the ripple effect of the uncertainty on the markets, but what's the ripple effect on average americans if this thing doesn't happen? >> it's mostly going to be psychological throughout the week. people perceive -- suddenly start perce
panetta went to iraq and afghanistan. he did not go to pakistan. i take that as a strong message. it is easy when you're in that region to attack on an extra couple of days for an important ally. i think that cross the minds of everyone who planned the trip. it was clearly a conscious decision not to go to pakistan. i think that is in part because when osama bin laden was killed on may 2 there was a list of things that we would ask the pakistan's to do, the pakistani to do, and i have not acted on any of them. this administration also put a hold on a $10 million in assistance. a great way to resolve that is sending the defense secretary to talk to folks about what is going on, but he did not. you are seeing already how differently the pentagon will treat allies in the region. "the in this morning's financial times" they had this headline -- guest: the withdrawal deadline is aggressive. they're talking about getting half of the troops out during the prime fighting season. they do not fight as much during the wintertime. we are starting to withdraw troops during a tumultuous situat
. they are concentrated, concentrated in the area of american occupation, especially afghanistan, especially iraq, and increasingly the spillover of afghanistan into pakistan is causing huge number of attacks there. and so what's been occurring is not just a large number of suicide attacks, but a large number of anti-american inspired suicide attacks. >> besides the obvious policy of pulling out is there another policy? >> absolutely. because pulling out simply abandons our interest, ignores our interest. with this book suggest is a middleground policy called offshore balancing. offshore balancing continues to pursue our core security interests and obligations in overseas regions, but does so with over the horizon air power, naval power, intelligence assets, relies on economic assets and political tools. and this is the core policy that we pursue as the united states is for decades the major regions of the world such as the middle east with great success. and we should return to this policy. >> can you give a specific about how we pursue this policy in the middle east? >> in the 1970s and '80s th
in our current conflicts in iraq and afghanistan. and people who traditionally wouldn't be in these kind of combat roles are finding themselves very much on the front line. and that means support units that have females in them and/or untraditional roles that, you know, people didn't sign up to be in the infantry are finding themselves on this front line. >> host: right. because traditionally we felt that combat were the infantry units. >> guest: exactly. >> host: so now we find jessica lynch who was a supply person on a convoy, and she finds herself in a fire fight, and she finds herself as the first p.o.w., which i want to go back to that in a little while because, of course, you were involved with some of that. you see someone like ruby who was up in in mow sulk on the day the bomber got through the front line and went into the cafeteria, into the mess hall and blew up the place. and she was one of the people blown up. the reality is i would say that's the front line. >> guest: absolutely. >> host: almost any place is the front line now if you're in iraq and afghanistan. >> guest: yea
in afghanistan, now his parents are picking up where he left off, challenging a minnesota state ballot initiative prohibiting same-sex marriage. i'll talk to them and the man sponsoring the bill coming up. with your mortgage, want to avoid foreclosure. candy? um-- well, you know, you're in luck. we're experts in this sort of thing, mortgage rigamarole, whatnot. why don't we get a contract? who wants a contract? [honks horn] [circus music plays] here you go, pete. thanks, betty. betty: we're out of toner. announcer: if you're facing foreclosure, talk to the right people. speak with hud-approved housing counselors free of charge at... . >>> minnesota is shaping up as the next battleground in the same-sex marriage debate. voters next year will consider a ballot initiative to amend the state constitution to define marriage as one man and one woman. the family of corporal andrew wilfahrt is adamantly opposed to it. their son, who was openly gay, was killed by an ied in afghanistan last february. i recently spoke with the wilfahrts about why gay rights has become so important to them. first listen to m
the morning off. >> we've got a lot of news this morning, including some breaking news out of afghanistan. >> that's right. we begin there where afghan president hamid karzai's half brother was found shot to death at his home. ahmed wali karzai was the provenÇal council chief of kandahar. he suffered gunshot wounds to his head and chest according to hospital officials. a spokesman for kandahar's government said a guard killed karzai. the taliban says -- >> we've seen the worst so far. excessive heat warnings and advisories posted in 23 states. the heat in many areas could reach 115 degrees. the heat wave is being blamed for one death in madison county, illinois. in oklahoma it was so hot, that part of a highway buckled. look at that. motorist was hospitalized after his bike hit the buckled pavement. in arkansas several communities have opened cooling centers. good rule of thumb in tis heat whatever you're doing don't overdo it. >> if you're going to go outside in heat like this better be drinking a lot of water before you come out. make sure you have some substance in your stomach or you
last act as commander of nato forces in afghanistan. he handed off authority to the new komd ander john allen. petraeus is retiring from the army at the end of the month. he will be taking over as director of the cia in september. >> that's right. the government not able to pay its bills is looming large they are morning. the clock ticks towards the deadline. 16 days now and counting. the president and congressional lead remember pecked to meet again this week. last week wasn't all that successful. at the same time, the senate will begin debating a scaled-back fallback plan. both sides say they are optimistic they will strike a deal. >> i'm confident cooler heads will prevail. at tend we will not allow the united states to default on its debt despite the fact some people think that would be okay. >> if the president keeps insisting on raising taxes on american workers, there's not going to be a deal. i do think, however, that republican leaders will not allow the country to go into default. >> president obama insists both parties must agree on a deal by friday in order for it to get pas
about nation building, failed states, afghanistan, iraq, somalia, iraq, haiti, the foreign policy challenges that we've faced weapon have the illusion which i would call the problem of getting to denmark. denmark is in quotations. it's not a real country. it's the mythical place that have low corruption, democracy, stable government, good services delivered very efficiently and so forth. we have the vision of denmark in the back of our heads and go to a place like afghanistan. how are we going to get afghanistan to look like denmark? and it doesn't work very well. and part of the reason that i began to realize was that we don't understand how denmark got to be denmark. i had a visiting professorship, so i've been going. most danes have no idea how denmark got to be denmark. it struck me as a political scientist, this ought to be a book you can go to to say where did political institutions come from. i didn't see one. so i decided to write it. that's why we get the book that i've produced. so i also did not want to write a book on the origins of politics that told this traditional
savings from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. these are real savings that cbo scores at about $1 trillion. we know that some republicans will quibble over these savings but they have no leg to stand on. but wars are the second biggest policy driver of our deficits after the bush tax cut for the conduct and the worst ads to our debt, to is undeniable that winding down the war's delivers savings. the administration tells us with the wind down, they can't prosecute -- they can count on billions of dollars over the next decade the cbo count $1.67 trillion. we know the republicans agree theythis mstath because included the same settings in the ryan budget that passed the house. they never criticized that accounting and it is hard to see how they could do so now. lastly, senator reid's proposal allows for a joint committee that has the potential to achieve deeper savings down the road. all in all, this is an offer that republicans cannot refuse. all of the cuts in center repots proposal have been supported at one point or another by republicans. if they refuse this offer, i
in afghanistan and next director of the c.i.a. certains -- earns a salary of approximately $180,000. the secretary of defense earns about $200,000. how then can we justify salaries of up to $700,000 for defense contractor executives? i understand there may be contractors who supply services to our nation that our government cannot perform on its own. however, i am also absolutely certain there is no one single private contractor whos value to our national security is twice that of the commander in chief of the united states military. at a time when the chairman of the joint chiefs is telling us that the nation's deaf is the number one threat facing america, we cannot continue -- debt is the number one threat facing america, we cannot keep paying private contractor salaries that are more than triple the pay of our military leadership. my amendment simply states that funds in this bill will not be used to pay a federal government salary for any individual defense contractor that exceeds the valerie of the secretary of defense. that sal -- salary of the secretary of defense. that s
the thdrawal in afghanistan to u.s. relationships with china. the los angeles angels of anaheim has written apart from the firs family there may b no one who spends more time than donilon. as the u.s. faces economic challenges at home and rapid changes abroad with an arab spring, the white houshas made its mission to restore american prestige and influence and power around the world. i'm pleased t have tom donilon at this table for the first time welcome. >> thank you, charlie, great to be here. good to see you. >> rose: there's so much to talk about in limited time. we could spend 30 minutes just talking about your biography and your friendship with warren christopher, the clinton administration, all of that. you combine policy and politics in earlier careers and now it's the focus of the united states and its relationship with the world. how do you view the mission? because you said you wanted to restore america's credibility, its influence, its respect, and its power. >> well, i think that's exactly right, and that is our core goal at this point. we came into office in 2009 after a diffi
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